Today I will Do What Others Won't
So Tomorrow I Can Do What Others Can't

Do You Hate Forgetting to Do Tasks? This is the Tool I use on a Daily Basis to manage massive workloads and Complex tasks.

Beating Cognitive Overload is the absolute must do for any professional today. Whether you work in the professional corporate arena, run a Business or just have lots to do this is how to do it.

Cognitive overload happens because you are trying to juggle everything in your work and life and cannot possibly handle the level of complexity that you have. Too many things to juggle, too many things to worry about and often we end up forgetting what it was we were going to do.

Use this method to get yourself sorted out!

1.     Brain Dump

On Friday, write down everything you can think of that you need to do in the following week. Get it all out on paper so that there is nothing that is going to bother you over the weekend. If you don’t get it all out, you will end up thinking about work all weekend rather than recovering like you should be.

2.     Categorise your to do

Break your to-do list up into categories. You are going to use those categories to compartmentalise your to-do list into areas so that you can manage them for both importance and urgency.

3.     Draw a mind map

Create a mind map. Use a circle with your name in it for the center (See below image for the mind map example). Then list out your categories as sub-items on the page. Once you have done that, list your to-do items under their categories. This will enable you to visually manage your workload and significantly improve your efficiency.

4.     Update mind map during your week

Updating the mind map with additional tasks and crossing off the ones you have completed will keep you on top of your workload and able to prioritise rapidly and respond to the crisis as they arrive because you know what you need to do and what can be left until later.

5.     End of week sign off and brain dump

You’ve finished your working week. Close off your todo list. Write down everything you need to do (just like step one) and go and recover over your weekend.

6.     Start of week review and update – Do it again.

Review your mind map, add in your items from your brain dump and start your week over again.

How I like to manage the mind maps

You can make your mind map have as many tiers as you like but for myself personally I rarely find a use for going beyond the two tiers plus one additional than what is shown in the example.

Your mind map will enable you to prioritise what you work on.

As we can be often pulled away to many different meetings that are often more of a distraction than use to us and you can use your mind map to define what meetings you should attend or should not attend.

Below is a simple example of how a mind map can be put to use:

Conclusion

Human’s are visual beings. We do not deal well with unorganised lists of tasks, they seem overwhelming and do not allow us to prioritise our workloads.

By Drawing a mindmap of your intended activities you can concentrate on the areas you need to and have a clear understanding in your own mind as to how things can be done.

I have used this technique to manage millions of dollars in project capital expenditure and nothing else even comes close to increasing my productivity than a mindmap.

Use this method to get yourself sorted out!

1.     Brain Dump

2.     Categorise your to do

3.     Draw a mind map

4.     Update mind map during your week

5.     End of week sign off and brain dump

6.     Start of week review and update – Do it again.

Finished. DFTBA

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